Stream Broadway Shows and Musicals: Filmed on Stage

COME FROM AWAY is now Certified Fresh on Rotten Tomatoes - Read the reviews!

The COME FROM AWAY film is now Certified Fresh on Rotten Tomatoes with a perfect score of 100% based on 16 reviews! Read all the reviews here - updating live throughout the day.

If you haven't watched the musical yet, here's how you can now stream COME FROM AWAY for free!

 

 

Brian Lowry, CNN: "Amid a slew of documentary programming tied to the 20th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, the best thing to watch turns out to be a streaming Broadway musical. Much like "Hamilton" on Disney+,"Come From Away" delivers a best-seat-in-the-house view, offering a moving, brilliantly shot and staged spectacle that brings that moment unerringly back to life."

Charles McNulty, LA Times: "Filmed at the Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre in New York in May with an audience that included 9/11 survivors and frontline workers, this presentation of “Come From Away” preserves the folksy charm of a musical that would have likely fallen flat in a dramatic adaptation. The screen version is less cinematically kinetic than the “Hamilton” movie that came out last year on Disney+, but the theatrical envelope of the production is artfully maintained."

 

 

Alonso Duralde, The Wrap: "It’s the kind of piece that makes one wish “a triumph of the human spirit” weren’t such an irredeemable cliché, as a dozen talented performers portray multiple roles each, as the townspeople of Gander, Newfoundland — who suddenly found themselves host to thousands of stranded travelers when U.S. airspace was closed down — and as the travelers themselves, all of whom are trying to make the best of a horrible situation."

Amy Amatangelo, Paste Magazine: "I had no expectations of Come From Away, one of the last live productions I attended before the world shut down. Although nominated for seven Tony Awards in 2017, the musical has not achieved broad pop cultural acclaim. Perhaps that’s because it tells the story of what happened when 38 commercial flights full of 7,000 passengers were grounded for five days in the town of Gander, Newfoundland after September 11, 2001. Let’s be honest: It’s not a plot description that screams “This calls for a Broadway musical.” But it is one of the most amazing musicals I have ever seen. Its themes of hope, love, community and grief combined with its message, focused on what can be achieved when people come together for a collective life-affirming goal, is timeless. Perhaps now, when we are smack dab in the middle of another crisis, Come From Away can be an escape, a ray of light, a salve on our open wounds. It’s a gift—truly—that a filmed performance of the stage musical is being made available on the eve of the 20th anniversary of September 11. (By the way, Come From Away returns to Broadway on September 21 and a quick search indicates tickets will run you $100-200. It makes the $4.99/month of Apple TV+ look like a bargain.)"

 

 

Sandra Hall, Sydney Morning Herald: "There’s a dash of A Chorus Line in Me and the Sky, her song about the long road she had to take to claim her place in the air and the joyous obsession which took her there. But it’s the only song that soars. Nor are there any dance numbers to take the breath away. Like so many modern musicals done in recitative style, this one has a tempo that never moves beyond a rolling boil."

Elisabeth Vincentelli, New York Times: "You would have to be green and hate Christmas to wish ill on this story. At the same time, the show does not elicit passionate feelings of any kind: It is ... nice."

Kevin Maher, Times (UK): "A musical that found hope in the ashes of 9/11 here acquires unexpected significance in the light of the pandemic. Come from Away is a feelgood Broadway smash set in the remote Newfoundland town of Gander in the five days after the Twin Towers attacks. Thirty-eight passenger jets and their 7,000 travellers were stranded there, embraced by kind strangers at a time of ineffable fear and anxiety. The movie adaptation was nixed by Covid, so instead its director, Christopher Ashley, has produced an unfussy recording (tracking shots, pans, a couple of close-ups) of the musical, which was staged at Broadway’s Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre this summer."